Did You See That Press Release? Favorite Restaurants, Movies and … Words

With thousands of news releases published each week on PR Newswire for Journalists, no one can possibly keep up with every one of them. Here are some of our favorite releases from the past week that you might have missed.

If you’re not already a registered member of PR Newswire for Journalists, you can register at prnmedia.prnewswire.com.  Customize your profile to get the news releases you want before they make headlines. It’s free and takes only a few moments.

Source: PRNewsFoto/OpenTable Logo

Source: PRNewsFoto/OpenTable Logo

OpenTable Restaurant Reviews Reveal Top 100 Restaurants in America

As we cheer the end of another year of delicious dining, OpenTable is pleased to celebrate the 2014 Diners’ Choice Award winners for the Top 100 Best Restaurants in America and highlight the Top 10 honorees.

These awards reflect the combined opinions of more than 5 million restaurant reviews submitted by verified OpenTable diners for more than 20,000 restaurants in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. See the full release to learn what restaurants made the list.

Want to make sure you don’t miss releases like this? Sign up for PR Newswire for Journalists and create a free profile to have releases emailed to you about restaurants, surveys, and other topics you cover. Get started now.

NASA Rover Finds Active, Ancient Organic Chemistry on Mars

NASA’s Mars Curiosity rover has measured a tenfold spike in methane, an organic chemical, in the atmosphere around it and detected other organic molecules in a rock-powder sample collected by the robotic laboratory’s drill.

“This temporary increase in methane — sharply up and then back down — tells us there must be some relatively localized source,” said Sushil Atreya of the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, and Curiosity rover science team. “There are many possible sources, biological or non-biological, such as interaction of water and rock.” See the full release to learn more.

Interested in receiving more science and aerospace news like this? Sign up for PR Newswire for Journalists and create a free profile to get releases sent to you by email on the topics you cover. Get started now.

Source: AP Photo

Source: AP Photo

Gone but Not Forgotten: Gone With the Wind Still America’s Favorite

It may have premiered 75 years ago, but it would appear that Wind has still got legs. When asked to name their favorite movie of all time, the septuagenarian Civil War epic Gone With the Wind is Americans’ top pick again (the film was also America’s favorite movie in 2008).

With six movies in the can and a much-discussed trailer now making the rounds for Episode Seven, Star Wars soars into the same runner up position it held in 2008.

Meanwhile, Titanic is doing anything but sinking; after not making The Harris Poll’s top 10 in 2008, the 1997 love story may not quite be king of the world this time around – but surely rounding out the top three is none too shabby. See the full release to learn what other movies made the list.

Don’t miss other film news like this. Sign up for PR Newswire for Journalists and create a free profile to get releases sent to you by email on the topics you cover.  Get started now.

Merriam-Webster Announces ‘Culture’ as 2014 Word of the Year

Merriam-Webster Inc. announced its top 10 Words of the Year for 2014. This year’s list was compiled by analyzing the top look-ups in the online dictionary at Merriam-Webster.com and focusing on the words that showed the greatest increase in look-ups this year as compared to last year.

The results, based on approximately 100 million look-ups a month, shed light on topics and ideas that sparked the nation’s interest in 2014. The Word of the Year, with the greatest number of look-ups and a significant increase over last year, is culture.

Culture is not associated with any one event, but instead dominated the headlines this year, on topics ranging from “celebrity culture” to “rape culture” to “company culture.”

In years past, lookups for the word culture spiked in the fall, as students encountered the word in titles and descriptions of courses and books, but this year lookups have moved from seasonal to persistent, as culture has become a term frequently used in discussions of social phenomena. See the full release to learn what other words made the list.

Want to make sure you don’t miss releases like this? Sign up for PR Newswire for Journalists and create a free profile to have releases emailed to you about the publishing industry and other topics you cover. Get started now.

Source: AP Photo

Source: AP Photo

AAA: 98.6 Million Americans Traveling this Holiday Season, Up 4%

AAA projects 98.6 million Americans will journey 50 miles or more from home during the year-end holiday season, an increase of 4% from the 94.8 million people who traveled last year.

This upward trend marks the highest forecast growth rate for the year-end holiday season since 2009 and the highest travel volume for the holiday period on record. (AAA data dates back to 2001.) The year-end holiday period is defined as Tuesday, Dec. 23 to Sunday, Jan. 4.  See the full release to learn more.

Interested in receiving more automotive and travel news like this? Sign up for PR Newswire for Journalists and create a free profile to receive releases by email on the topics you cover. Get started now.

Larry Grady is online content manager at PR Newswire for Journalists. He has worked in business media for nearly 30 years and enjoys reality TV and daydreaming about travel and wine.

Around the Wire: #SydneySiege in Realtime, Sowing Mayhem and The Week’s Media Moves

Welcome to the latest installment of Around the Wire, PR Newswire’s round up of journalism, blogging, and freelancing stories from the past week.

1. Reporting the #SydneySiege in Realtime: Verification Risks and Ethical Challenges (World News Publishing Focus by WAN-IFRA)

The idea of live coverage has evolved with the evolution of social media. Once upon a time, a helicopter hovering over a highway or building provided us with updates. Now, tweets from citizen commentators have begun to fill the gaps, offering us a new version of “live from the scene.” But it doesn’t come without consequence.

This week, as a cafe in Sydney, Australia was held hostage, the spontaneous coverage provided by social media was a mixed bag of success and fueled the debate about the ethical risks surrounding live reporting and social media.

2. Sowing Mayhem, One Click at a Time (The New York Times)

Journalism has evolved from the days of the man on the street interview. With the advent of social media, we have seen a type of citizen journalism evolve. Sometimes good, and other times not. In the case of Charles C. Johnson, many would argue the latter.

Mr. Johnson, the man who claims to have recently outed the UVA rape victim, is making a career of such actions. His GotNews website, while riling the feathers of many, adds just another wrinkle to what makes up today’s journalism landscape.

3. RWB Published 2014 Round-Up of Violence Against Journalists (Reporters Without Borders)

The past year has not been one without conflict. From Ferguson to the Middle East, journalists have been on the front lines reporting the atrocities of war, messages of protest, and tragedy. These stories do not come without risks as many times the best stories demand the highest consequences.

Here, Reporters Without Borders provides us with a recap of the violence against journalists in 2014.

4. The Year in Media Errors and Corrections 2014 (Poynter)

Well, nothing is perfect, right? Over the past 12 months there have been a number of unintentional gaffes made by members of the media. Poynter offers us some of the best from 2014 because it’s healthy to laugh at ourselves once in a while.

5. Media News and Moves for the Week of December 15 (PR Newswire’s Media Moves)

Media Moves keeps you up to date with who went where in the world of media. This week’s edition includes a new executive editor at Gawker, a few additions and subtractions at Bloomberg, and USA Today announcing it will no longer print its weekly insert USA Weekend.

Subscribe to Beyond Bylines in the sidebar or add our RSS feed to get media trends, journalist interviews, blog profiles, and more sent right to your inbox or feed reader.

Ryan Hansen is an audience researcher with PR Newswire keeping track of the latest New York media moves. Follow him @RPH2004 for tweets about media, food, and his general take on something that may be irrelevant.

#ConnectChat: Why Good Writers Disconnect During the Holidays (and How To Do It This Year)

ConnectChat Rachel Weingarten

Whether you work for a large publication or are self-employed, it may be challenging to balance all your professional and personal obligations, especially during the holidays.

Learning how to “shut off” and appreciate what’s in front of you may seem easy, but doesn’t often happen. But it’s necessary if you want to avoid burn-out.

During last week’s ProfNet #ConnectChat, lifestyle writer, style columnist and author Rachel Weingarten (@rachelcw) discussed how to balance the demands of work and the holidays.

Weingarten knows a thing or two about having to take time for a break.  “I have two simultaneous full-time jobs,” she mentioned during the chat. “I’m a marketing and personal brand strategist and also a writer/columnist and author of three nonfiction books. My latest book is called ‘Ancient Prayer: Channeling Your Faith 365 Days of the Year.'”

On top of all of that, she teaches graduate-level marketing and is often a guest on morning TV shows. Of course, something’s got to give. “Since I’m the proverbial shoemaker’s child going barefoot,” she adds, “my own website(s) is/are woefully outdated.”

Read on for some of the tips and tools this professional multi-tasker can’t live without. You may even learn how to truly be ‘out of office’ during the holidays.

How can we avoid holiday frazzle and really enjoy the season?

It’s hard not to get frazzled during this time of year.

For some, it’s about remembering the deeper meaning behind the winter holidays. For others, it’s about reconnecting with the people you love. For still others, it’s cutting through the crush to buy everything in sight and instead concentrate on what’s meaningful to yourself or those you love.

So perhaps the best thing to do is treat the holidays like any puzzle or even work project. Come up with a plan — how much time you’ll devote to shopping, how much you will or won’t spend, how much time you’ll spend with relatives, and how to respond (or not at all) to those well-meaning relatives who seem determined to cut you down to size.

There’s so much about life that isn’t manageable, perhaps the key is to learning to manage expectations during the holidays.

The holidays are a wonderful excuse to distill your feelings and emotions down to what matters most. Sometimes that gets lost in the retail shuffle and the old bad feelings can emerge. Try to focus on the simple things — hot chocolate on a cold morning and a gift that really means something.

It doesn’t have to be life changing to matter.

What about at work? Is it possible to balance holiday cheer with professional obligations?

Probably not. Okay, I’ll amend that — probably not entirely.

I used to create/lead a lot of professional etiquette workshops and one of the things we discussed was that whole personality clash/balance thing. It can be hard to get through incredible work pressures while trying to plan holiday fun.

Conversely, it can feel impossible to get through a holiday meal or get together without checking email or texts 34 times.

I think setting boundaries for yourself can be the most important thing to do on both counts.

Don’t forget to work when you’re being paid to do just that, but don’t forget to enjoy the not so simple pleasures of family and friends during holiday time.

What role has technology played in finding a work/life balance? Has it made it better or worse?

Instinctively of course, I’d say worse. But that’s what people thought when the light bulb and telephone and radio and TV were invented.

But I do worry that people are so busy staring at screens and comparing their highlight reels to everyone else’s. People seem to miss out on life’s smaller moments and eye contact seems to be a dying art.

That said, our hyper-connected lifestyle doesn’t seem to be going anywhere, so it’s time for us to figure out how to make that help us in the long run.

Setting up apps for everything from making your greeting card lists to gift buying to travel to setting up autoresponders or putting your phone on sleep mode during family time can help reclaim some balance.

What about freelancers? How can they better manage their time, most especially during the holiday and end-of-year crush?

Being self-employed, this is something that I struggle with on a daily basis. It’s hard to shut off at the best of times, much less when you’re the proverbial chief cook and bottle washer.

For me at least, it’s setting guidelines — no email responses after x o’clock; taking a weekly tech Sabbath.

Maybe start by informing your clients that you’ll be out of the office in advance and try to finish up projects or at the very least inform clients or colleagues of when you’ll be back and ready to finish things up.

The flip side is that as an obsessive freelancer, I also usually pick up a ton of business during the holidays. It’s a fun way to take advantage of the corporate culture that shuts down for much of December. But that’s my personal choice — and I get to charge a lot more for those gigs!

How important is it to delegate responsibilities when it comes to achieving work/life balance?

Crucial. But it’s as important to know which responsibilities can be delegated and also when to let go of perfectionism. It’s also a lot easier said than done.

That’s something only you know about yourself and your workload though. To quote the Disney song that has been seared into all of our ears over the past year — it’s important to learn to “Let it go.”

The pursuit of perfection is an impossible ideal. Understanding how to be great while still having a life is, in my opinion, the more achievable and attractive ideal. Learning to delegate is probably your best tool in doing just that.

Why do you think it’s challenging for people to find a way to balance their professional with their personal obligations?

For all of the above reasons and then social media magnifies the achievements of others. If it wasn’t already hard enough to keep up with the people you went to high school with, your neighbors and coworkers, now you’re reminded of everyone else’s accomplishments on a daily basis.

What are your best tips for disconnecting just enough but not too much over the holidays?

I think that’s the key. Figuring out what’s just enough.

I don’t think it’s realistic any more to think you can disconnect entirely during any point, even the holidays.

Maybe set up a twice-a-day check-in. Then, schedule responses and calls and texts and stick to it. It’s a huge relief not to be chained to your obligations.

And maybe that’s a takeaway for year round, so that you no longer allow yourself to wake up at 3:30 a.m. panicked that you forgot a work thing or neglected your kid.

I’m a huge fan of things like Boomerang for Gmail, so you can at least seem to not always be available.

Do you have any tips or advice for people on the pressure to change at the beginning of the year?

Don’t do it! My first instinct is to tell you to stop being so hard on yourself. You’ve developed into the person you are by understanding your best qualities.

Of course we all feel so much pressure to change and to want to become better, so I say take baby steps. Start with one small thing and build from there. Don’t change everything, just the parts that are no longer working for you.

Need sources and experts for that story you’re working on right now?  ProfNet has thousands of folks available to help. Submit a query, search more than 60,000 profiles on ProfNet Connect, or get timely experts and story ideas by email — all for free! Register at PR Newswire for Journalists and submit your query on the ProfNet tab or email profnet@profnet.com if you’d like help getting started.

For more of Weingarten’s holiday tips, read the full #ConnectChat recap on ProfNet Connect.

Polina Opelbaum is a community services specialist with ProfNet. To read more from Polina, check out her blog on ProfNet Connect.

2014 Rewind: A Year of The News in The News

As 2014 comes to a close, it’s time to turn inward and reflect on the year that has passed and its influences on what’s to come. Over the next few weeks, we’ll rewind the year, looking not just at what happened in the news, but also what’s happened and what’s ahead for Beyond Bylines. 

2014 Rewind - Media on Media Final

Some of the most compelling news stories of 2014 were about the very industry we rely on to report the news – the media.  This year brought controversy and conflict in journalism, including allegations of plagiarism, the implications of drone journalism, and the dangers freelancers face covering conflicts in foreign lands.

COPYCATS UNCOVERED

Allegations of plagiarism by BuzzFeed politics writer/editor Benny Johnson were undoubtedly one of the biggest stories in the media world.

It all happened so quickly.  In the span of a week in July, a pair of Twitter users @blippoblappo and @crushingbort of ourbadmedia.wordpress.com “broke the story” and within a few days, BuzzFeed conducted its own high-speed investigation where it discovered 41 instances of plagiarism.  The company fired Johnson by week’s end and issued an apology to readers. 

In the apology, BuzzFeed addressed the site’s evolution into a globally recognized news source now subject to higher standards of reporting.

“BuzzFeed started seven years ago as a laboratory for content,” wrote BuzzFeed’s Ben Smith.  “Our writers didn’t have journalistic backgrounds and weren’t held to traditional journalistic standards, because we weren’t doing journalism. But that started changing a long time ago.”

While BuzzFeed may feel it’s closed this chapter, the ordeal raised other questions about challenges editors face in spotting plagiarism, be it traditional or non-traditional outlets.

For instance, did you know there are different types of plagiarism?  Poynter provides tips to help identify them here: poynter.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/IsitPlagiarism.pdf. The Online News Association’s #ONA14 blog also shares advice on how to avoid plagiarizing someone’s work.

Meanwhile, the ironies of the BuzzFeed story don’t end there.  Johnson was hired by National Review as its first social media editor. National Review is cited as one of the publications Johnson lifted from.

DRONES IN THE AIR AND ON OUR MIND

Yep, the same drones that Amazon’s proposing to deliver packages, some news outlets want to use to take pictures and videotape areas hit by natural disasters like hurricanes and tornadoes.

NPR’s All Tech Considered reported in May how Little Rock, Arkansas ABC affiliate, KATV was able to capture tornado damage from 150 feet in the air using a drone with a  camera attached to it.  And, researchers at the Drone Journalism Lab (yes, there is such a place) have been testing how drones can be used to collect news. The lab was established at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln’s College of Journalism and Mass Communications in Nov. 2011.

Earlier this year, the idea of using drones or “unmanned aircraft systems” (UAS) for newsgathering purposes gained momentum when First Amendment questions were raised after the FAA banned news orgs from using a UAS without authorization.

Several major news organizations, including the Associated Press, New York Times, and others have banded together to stand up against the FAA’s ban in the form of a brief filed with the National Traffic and Safety Board that says the use of drones in newsgathering efforts should be distinguished from commercial use of drones and therefore, deserves First Amendment protection.

Newsrooms nationwide anxiously are awaiting the FAA’s decision. To help the process along, CNN and Georgia Tech have joined forces to examine and “better understand the opportunities unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) present for media organizations, and to explore the access and safety issues that need to be addressed as part of any new regulatory framework.”

Congress has required the FAA to integrate drones into U.S. airspace by fall of next year. We’ll keep an eye on the story and provide updates on new developments in the new year (read about the FAA’s Dec. 10 ruling on Reuters.com).  For now, one thing is clear – drone journalism is not going away.

FREELANCING FEARS

The tragic deaths of freelance journalists James Foley and Steven Sotloff by Islamic militants in Syria last summer was both a profoundly sad and scary turn of events.  Their deaths reignited fears freelancers face covering the Syrian conflict and similar danger zones.

“Syria has been the most dangerous country in the world for journalists for more than two years,” says the Committee to Protect Journalists (CPJ), adding that “at least 70 other journalists have been killed covering the conflict there, including some who died over the border in Lebanon and Turkey.”

CPJ is calling for media organizations to acknowledge the risk these journalists face and step up their efforts to protect them.

“And it’s also time for those news organizations that for financial and liability reasons want a strictly arm’s-length relationship with stringers to recognize they have a duty of care toward those they send or encourage to go to the front lines,” the agency says.

So what steps can journalists take to protect themselves in high-risk situations, specifically freelancers who are pretty much on their own reporting stories in unsafe parts of the world?

PBS’s MediaShift says a communications plan is essential and outlines the crucial elements that should be a part of the plan – a reliable contact person, detailed contact information, and an established check-in schedule.  A well-thought out plan could save a life.

Interested in news about media issues, trends and other updates?  Sign up for a media newsfeed via PR Newswire for Journalists. You also can subscribe to Beyond Bylines in the sidebar or add our RSS feed to get media trends, journalist interviews, blog profiles, and more sent right to your inbox or feed reader.

Brett Simon is senior manager of PR Newswire’s media relations team. Follow her @savsimon.

Blog Profiles: Building & Architecture Blogs

Building & Architecture Blogs We Love

Building & Architecture Blogs We Love

Welcome to Blog Profiles! Each week, PR Newswire media relations manager Christine Cube selects an industry or subject and a handful of sites that do a good job with promoting, contributing, and blogging about the space. Do you have a blog that deserves recognition? Tell Christine why on PR Newswire for Bloggers.

I love old buildings. In fact, a few years ago, when I was looking for a house in the DC area, I much preferred something extremely old and more fixer than upper.

My husband didn’t exactly share the same desire, and we compromised.

But my love of architecture and old buildings remains intact. So, I decided it was time to look at some quality blogs on the building, architecture, and design front.

BLDGBLOG provides an intriguing look at architecture, landscape, and urban speculation. It’s written by Geoff Manaugh.

BLDGBLOG caught my eye for several reasons.

First, it’s a very attractive site filled with art, photography, and renderings. Second, the writing is really accessible. Finally, the content is just fascinating.

In his post Under London, Manaugh says, “I’m a sucker for images of the human form stranded amidst the shadows of massive, dimensionally abstract spatial environments, so I thought I’d post these purely as eye candy.”

Other posts I enjoyed include Monumental, which is a short post on a painting by Erastus Salisbury Field called Historical Monument of the American Republic, and The Neurological Side-Effects of 3D.

Follow @bldgblog on Twitter.

Dezeen’s mission is to bring readers a selection of the “best architecture, design and interiors projects from around the world.”

According to the site, it was launched Nov. 2006 and since has rapidly grown, attracting more than 1.75 million unique visitors a month.

The site covers a ton of ground, including interiors, design, technology, and news. It also features jobs.

Some of the posts that I found interesting include 3XN reveals “dynamic, undulating” design for Swiss Olympic headquarters, Hiroyuki Ito completes Tokyo housing block with staggered concrete silhouette, and timber disks speckle the concave facades of Studio Gang’s Michigan college building.

Follow @Dezeen on Twitter.

A Daily Dose of Architecture provides “(almost) daily architectural musings and imagery from New York City.” It’s written and managed by architect and blogger John Hill.

It’s hard not to get caught up in the photos Hill takes for his posts. They’re pretty awesome; he’s got a great eye.

One of my favorite posts was Cooper Hewitt Unveiled, which covered the press preview of the unveiling of the Cooper Hewitt Smithsonian Design Museum’s three-year reno. The museum opened to the public on Dec. 12.

Other posts I enjoyed include A Year in Architecture 2014 and The Next Glass Walkway?

Follow @archidose on Twitter.

Dwell happens to be one of my favorite magazines. My best friend – an industrial designer – introduced me to this awesome piece of journalism and design.

Dwell itself says it’s “staging a minor revolution.”

“We think that it’s possible to live in a house or apartment by a bold modern architect, to own furniture and products that are exceptionally well designed, and still be a regular human being,” the site says. “We think that good design is an integral part of real life.”

Narrowing down some noteworthy posts to just a few was nearly impossible. Some posts that caught my attention were Adventurous Apartment Building Made of 36 Shipping Containers, Fantastic Desks Complete These Inviting Home Offices, and A Modern House in Rural Spain.

In the latter post, writer Diana Budds says of the modern vacation home in central Spain of a pair of architects: “Though the structure is firmly planted in the 21st century, sheep from a farm across the road still meander to Churtichaga and de la Quadra-Salcedo’s house to graze—an enduring reminder of the region’s history and traditions.”

Follow @dwell on Twitter.

Planting Acorns takes pride in “developing value beyond the build.”

The site is a product of Stewart Perry, which provides commercial construction services in the southeast, southwest, and mid-Atlantic states.

On the site, company founder Merrill Stewart talks about how “people are so much more than their jobs.” Stewart uses the analogy of planting acorns.

“You start with a seed, find it a place to grow, give it a little nourishment and sooner or later it will sprout up into a tall oak tree loaded down with branches,” he said. “If you plant a variety of these acorns — employees, contacts, friendly business relationships — you’ll be amazed at the response you get.”

The blog is about “helping you find seeds of potential where others only see a blank space.”

Some of the posts that caught my eye on Planting Acorns include Vertical Expansion in an Existing Building and Trading Cars for a Bike.

Follow @mstewartjr on Twitter.

P.S. Ever wonder how we come up with ideas for our blog profiles? Our handy list of industries and subjects on PR Newswire for Journalists stays top of mind. If you’re a blogger or journalist looking for building, construction, or design news, let us know. We’re happy to customize that feed for you on PR Newswire for Journalists.

Christine Cube is a media relations manager with PR Newswire and freelance writer. Follow her @cpcube.

Did You See That Press Release? Worst Passengers, Best Athletes, Plus a Very Royal Visit

With thousands of news releases published each week on PR Newswire for Journalists, no one can possibly keep up with every one of them. Here are some of the top releases from the past week that you might have missed.

If you’re not already a registered member of PR Newswire for Journalists, you can register at prnmedia.prnewswire.com.  Customize your profile to get the news releases you want before they make headlines. It’s free and takes only a few moments.

Source: AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh

Source: AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh

The Sound and the Fury: Expedia Study of In-Flight Etiquette Finds ‘Rear Seat Kickers’ Have Passed ‘Inattentive Parents’ as America’s Least-Favorite Airplane Passenger

Expedia.com released on Dec. 9 the results of the second annual Airplane Etiquette Study, which asked 1,000 Americans to rank the most annoying on-board behaviors of fellow passengers.

The study was commissioned by Expedia and conducted by GfK, an independent global market research company. Last year, “Inattentive Parents” topped the list of most aggravating airplane passengers.

This year, “Rear Seat Kickers” have displaced the parents, pushing them to second place, ahead of such etiquette violators as the “Aromatic Passenger,” the “Audio Insensitive,” the “Boozer,” and “Chatty Cathy.” See the full release to learn what other types of bad behavior made the list.

Want to make sure you don’t miss releases like this? Sign up for PR Newswire for Journalists and create a free profile to have releases emailed to you about the airline industry and other topics you cover. Get started now.

University of Virginia Chapter of Phi Kappa Psi Refutes Rolling Stone Allegations

The University of Virginia chapter of Phi Kappa Psi issued a statement this week in response to the allegations in a recent Rolling Stone article.

“Over the past two weeks the Virginia Alpha Chapter of Phi Kappa Psi has been working tirelessly and openly with the Charlottesville Police Department as they investigate the allegations detailed in the November 19, 2014 Rolling Stone article. We continue to be shocked by the allegations and saddened by this story.” See the full release to read more.

Interested in receiving more higher education and current events news? Sign up for PR Newswire for Journalists and create a free profile to get releases sent to you by email on the topics you cover. Get started now.

Source: PRNewsFoto/Sports Illustrated

Source: PRNewsFoto/Sports Illustrated

San Francisco Giants’ Madison Bumgarner Named 2014 Sports Illustrated Sportsman of the Year

San Francisco Giants pitcher Madison Bumgarner is Sports Illustrated’s 2014 Sportsman of the Year.

The Giants’ lefthander turned in a season for the ages highlighted by two World Series wins and a five-inning save in Game 7 on two days rest to lead his team to its third world championship in five years. This was a virtuoso performance by the World Series MVP that many believe we won’t see again.

Since 1954, Sports Illustrated editors have annually presented the Sportsman of the Year Award to the athlete, team or coach who transcended the year in sports by achieving the highest level of athletic excellence, while demonstrating the ideals of sportsmanship.

Bumgarner, 25, becomes part of a group that includes among others Muhammad Ali, Joe Montana, LeBron James, Jack Nicklaus, Peyton Manning, and Billie Jean King to be honored. See the full release to learn more.

Don’t miss other sports and magazine news like this. Sign up for PR Newswire for Journalists and create a free profile to get releases sent to you by email on the topics you cover.  Get started now.

Record-Setting Postseason Caps off 2014 MLS Campaign

Major League Soccer set new records for postseason television viewership, attendance, digital audience, and social media engagement as the League concluded its 19th season on Dec. 7 with the LA Galaxy defeating the New England Revolution 2-1 at MLS Cup 2014.

With fans tuning in from home and across digital platforms, two million viewers in the U.S. watched MLS Cup, an increase of 93 percent over MLS Cup 2013, according to Nielsen research.

An audience of 964,000 watched the league’s 19th championship match on ESPN, while 678,000 viewed on UniMás and 245,000 tuned into Univision Deportes Network (UDN). In addition, 89,000 unique viewers watched MLS Cup on WatchESPN, accumulating 4.3 million live minutes viewed.

MLS Cup 2014 set an all-time record for Spanish-language viewers, as 923,000 soccer fans watched the game on UniMás and on UDN.   See the full release to learn more.

Want to make sure you don’t miss releases like this? Sign up for PR Newswire for Journalists and create a free profile to have releases emailed to you about television ratings, soccer, and other topics you cover. Get started now.

Source: PRNewsForo/CityKids Foundation

Source: PRNewsFoto/CityKids Foundation

The Door and The CityKids Foundation Welcome the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge During Their First Visit to New York City

Two of New York City’s leading youth organizations – The Door and The CityKids Foundation – welcomed Their Royal Highnesses, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge for a tour and youth performance, including original song, dance and theater pieces, during their first official visit to New York City.

Additionally, the Duke and Duchess sat down for a private meeting with eight young people from The Door and The CityKids Foundation to learn more about their experiences growing up in New York City, the obstacles they faced, and the steps they took to shape who they are today. See the full release to learn more.

Interested in receiving more non-profit and children-related news like this? Sign up for PR Newswire for Journalists and create a free profile to receive releases by email on the topics you cover. Get started now.

Larry Grady is online content manager at PR Newswire for Journalists. He has worked in business media for nearly 30 years and enjoys reality TV and daydreaming about travel and wine.

Around the Wire: TIME’s Person of the Year, Revolt at The New Republic & The Week’s Media Moves

Welcome to the latest installment of Around the Wire, PR Newswire’s round up of journalism, blogging, and freelancing stories from the past week.

TIME Names Ebola Fighters

TIME Names Ebola Fighters Person of the Year (Image via time.com)

1. TIME Person of the Year: The Ebola Fighters (TIME)

Over the past year, we saw a number of remarkable people do remarkable things. As TIME’s person of the year, the Ebola Fighters are risking everything in their pursuit to control the deadly virus.

An outbreak that has spanned the globe, it has also changed how we report on it.   Reporters who were once vulnerable and uneducated on the risks now work under new protocol created on the fly. It’s an evolution in journalism that has been fascinating to watch.

2. Revolt at the New New Republic (The New York Times)

Some things are still sacred. That’s how a number of the journalists at The New Republic feel as shown by last week’s events.

After being purchased in 2012 by Facebook founder Chris Hughes, the initial plan was to preserve The New Republic’s tradition. Minor changes created a feeling of restoration the staff was eager to be a part of.

Then, in a drastic change of events, Hughes began a major overhaul, forcing out a beloved editor and moving toward a more digital approach. This has led to a walkout and a number of resignations.

3. How Graphic Writing Distorted the Focus of the Rolling Stone Rape Story (Poynter)

The Rolling Stone rape story has garnered national attention. Unfortunately, it has been for all the wrong reasons. An attempt to shed light on sexual abuse, it has highlighted a number of journalism miscues as the story continues to unravel.

4. 10 Viral Stunts that Won 2014 (Inc.)

It’s that time of year when we round up the best of the best of everything!

Here, Inc. has compiled the top 10 viral marketing campaigns of 2014. They all kept us talking and some we even participated in. And others, like a particular selfie, cost a reported $20 million to pull off.

5. Media News & Moves for the Week of December 8 (PR Newswire’s Media Moves)

Media Moves keeps you up to date with who went where in the world of media over the past week. This edition includes promotions at The Washington Post, additions to the staff at Bloomberg Businessweek, and a new senior politics editor at The Daily Beast.

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Ryan Hansen is an audience researcher with PR Newswire keeping track of the latest New York media moves. Follow him @RPH2004 for tweets about media, food, and his general take on something that may be irrelevant.