Around the Wire: Quartz Goes Home, Facebook’s Good News for Journalists & Tips for Blogging Blues

Welcome to the latest installment of Around the Wire, PR Newswire’s round up of journalism, blogging, and freelancing stories from the past week.

Screenshot of the redesigned Quartz homepage

Screenshot of the redesigned Quartz homepage

1. Maybe the Homepage is Alive After All: Quartz is Trying a New Twist on the Traditional Website Front Door (Nieman Journalism Lab)

Quartz, which previously heralded “The homepage is dead, and the social web has won,” dramatically shifted its website strategy this week. Previous visits to qz.com would take you to the site’s top story with scrolling navigation between articles.

However, the new homepage design now features a tailored summary of news modeled after their email newsletter. The goal: like other news sites’ homepages, to encourage return visits and build loyalty instead of depending solely on inbound traffic from social media.

2. Make Sure You Understand the Psychology of Pricing When Setting Your Freelance Rates (The Freelancer)

The question of “how much?” is one that sends many freelancers into a state of panic. As Charlie Kasov writes on Contently’s The Freelancer blog, “Too high and clients turn us down. Too low and we diminish the value of what we do.” Fortunately, there are a few psychological tricks freelancers can employ to squeeze the most out of their rates.

3. Still Debating the Merits of Taking Facebook Seriously As a Journalist? (David Higgerson)

Facebook rolled out another adjustment to its feed algorithm this week. The latest change rewards content that people spend time reading, instead of link-baiting to content that doesn’t deliver on a post’s promise.

David Higgerson, digital publishing director for Trinity Mirror’s regional sites, argues this is a great step for the media: “Facebook is reminding publishers to treat the Facebook audience with respect. It’s a bit stick and carrot but it’s good news for journalism – those who make the effort to build communities on Facebook will be rewarded.”

4. Down on Blogging? How to Beat the Blogging Blues (DailyBlogTips)

You’ve been blogging for a while and have run out of ideas. Or you’re overwhelmed by other things going on in your life and you don’t have the energy to blog. Or maybe you’re just bored. A lot of bloggers quit when they hit these “blogging blues.” Before you give up, try the four techniques in this blog post and get your blogging groove back.

5. Timeless Storytelling Tips from Former PR Newswire Features Editor Fred Ferguson (Beyond PR)

Fred FergusonWe were sad to hear news this week of the passing of former Features Manager Fred Ferguson. A veteran newsman who began his career as a Pacific Stars and Stripes stringer during the Korean War, Fred worked as a copyboy, reporter, editor, and regional executive for United Press International.

Later in his career, Fred used his experience as an award-winning features writer to counsel PR Newswire clients on how to incorporate feature news writing in their campaigns.

We remember Fred with these timeless storytelling tips he once shared and are signing off this week’s Around the Wire with his signature shorthand “outa pkt.”

Subscribe to Beyond Bylines in the sidebar or add our RSS feed to get media trends, journalist interviews, blog profiles, and more sent right to your inbox or feed reader. 

Amanda Hicken is a media relations manager with PR Newswire for Journalists. Follow her at @ADHicken for tweets about the media, comic books, and her love of Cleveland.

Did You See That Press Release? Fast Food Giant Created, Ebola Patient Released, ‘Breaking Bad’ Honored Again

With thousands of news releases published each week on PR Newswire for Journalists, no one can possibly keep up with every one of them. Here are some of our favorite releases from the past week that you might have missed.

If you’re not already a registered member of PR Newswire for Journalists, you can register at prnmedia.prnewswire.com.  Customize your profile to get the news releases you want before they make headlines. It’s free and takes only a few moments.

Source: AP Photo/Seth Wenig

Source: AP Photo/Seth Wenig

World’s Third Largest Quick Service Restaurant Company Launched with Two Iconic and Independent Brands: Tim Hortons and Burger King

On Aug. 26, an agreement was reached to create the world’s third largest quick service restaurant company. Tim Hortons Inc. and Burger King Worldwide Inc. announced a definitive agreement under which the two companies will create a new global powerhouse in the quick service restaurant sector.

With about $23 billion in system sales, more than 18,000 restaurants in 100 countries and two strong, thriving, independent brands, the new company will have an extensive international footprint and significant growth potential. The new global company will be based in Canada, the largest market of the combined company. See the full release to learn more about the deal.

Want to make sure you don’t miss releases like this? Sign up for PR Newswire for Journalists and create a free profile to have releases emailed to you about the restaurant industry and other topics you cover. Get started now.

Nancy Writebol, SIM Missionary Stricken with Ebola Virus, Declared Virus-Free and Discharged from Hospital

Nancy Writebol, the SIM missionary stricken with Ebola virus disease and undergoing treatment in an isolation unit at Emory University Hospital in Atlanta, has tested clear of the virus and was discharged from the hospital Aug. 19. She and her husband, David, have gone to an undisclosed location to rest and spend time with one another. Writebol is one of two patients treated for Ebola virus infection at Emory. The second patient, Kent Brantly, MD, was discharged Aug. 21. See the full release to learn more.

Interested in receiving more infectious disease and public safety news like this? Sign up for PR Newswire for Journalists and create a free profile to get releases sent to you by email on the topics you cover. Get started now.

Source: AP Photo/Casey Curry

Source: AP Photo/Casey Curry

Sony Pictures Television’s Breaking Bad Caps Its Historic Run With Six Emmy Wins, Including Second Win for Outstanding Drama Series

Sony Pictures Television garnered five Emmy awards on July 25 for the final season of its groundbreaking dramatic series, Breaking Bad. The series, which earned 16 nominations and six wins total, essentially sweeping the top drama awards, took home Emmys for Outstanding Drama Series, Outstanding Writing for a Drama Series, Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series for Bryan Cranston, Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series for Aaron Paul, Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series for Anna Gunn, and Outstanding Single Camera Editing for a Drama Series. See the full release to learn more.

Don’t miss other television and entertainment news like this. Sign up for PR Newswire for Journalists and create a free profile to get releases sent to you by email on the topics you cover.  Get started now.

Nearly One-Quarter of Millennials Under Extreme Financial Stress

TD Bank announced the results of a new survey focusing on the top financial stresses for older millennials, ages 24-34. The survey, an extension of the TD Bank Financial Education Survey, revealed that 22 percent of millennials and 17 percent of Hispanic millennials feel they are under extreme financial stress. Additionally, 55 percent of millennials and 60 percent of Hispanic millennials feel they are able to manage their finances, but are having difficulty finding financial happiness.

The nationwide survey polled more than 1,000 millennials, including 150 Hispanic millennials, to determine their financial preparedness for major life events, such as going to college and purchasing a home.

Want to make sure you don’t miss releases like this? Sign up for PR Newswire for Journalists and create a free profile to have releases emailed to you about personal finance, banking and other topics you cover. Get started now.

Oak Hill Capital Partners to Acquire Berlin Packaging for $1.43 Billion

Oak Hill Capital Partners announced Aug. 25 that it has entered into a definitive agreement to acquire Berlin Packaging LLC, a supplier of rigid packaging products and services in North America, from Investcorp. Oak Hill is investing in partnership with Berlin Packaging’s current management team, led by Chairman and CEO Andrew Berlin. The transaction is valued at $1.43 billion. See the full release to learn more.

Interested in receiving more acquisition and business news like this? Sign up for PR Newswire for Journalists and create a free profile to receive releases by email on the topics you cover. Get started now.

Larry Grady is online content manager at PR Newswire for Journalists. He has worked in business media for nearly 30 years and enjoys reality TV and daydreaming about travel and wine.

Make Them Laugh! How to Add Humor to Your Writing

Adding Humor to your writing - ProfNet ConnectChat

You don’t have to be a comedian to inject a little humor into your writing. And even if you don’t consider yourself a funny person, there are tips and tricks you can use to make humor work for you.

On a recent ProfNet #ConnectChat, we spoke with Michele “Wojo” Wojciechowski, an award-winning freelance writer, humorist and standup comedian, about when and how to include a few laughs or cheeky barbs in your stories.

In 2013, Wojo won the Outstanding Book Award from the American Society of Journalists and Authors for her humor book, “Next Time I Move, They’ll Carry Me Out in a Box.” She also writes the humor column “Wojo’s World” and covers people in the comedy industry for Parade.com.

She counts Erma Bombeck, Fannie Flagg, E.B. White, James Thurber, and Lewis Grizzard among her influences.

Is there a place for humor in journalism?

Yes, it just depends on the story you’re covering. A serious business piece? No. A light feature? Absolutely! A whole article can be funny, like when I went undercover at a Renaissance festival and discovered my “inner wench.” Or you can start with a funny anecdote, then move into a more straightforward piece.

Are there any topics that are off limits? When is humor not appropriate?

Yes: rape, domestic violence, child abuse. You get the idea. Making a joke way too soon about a recent death or tragedy. People have lost their jobs doing this.

What are some of your favorite humor devices?

I love to use the “rule of 3.” You set something up, then have three funny parts that follow. Like:

I grew up in the city.
We had no wildlife. No critters at all.
Just waterbugs, pigeons, and rats.

You get the idea.

Does the type of humor matter? I would imagine snark, for example, would not be appropriate in most pieces.

It really depends on the publication, its audience, and the story topic. An alternative weekly might love snark, so the type of humor can vary. I keep my Wojo’s World column clean, but it runs in family pubs. Playboy, CollegeHumor, or even The New Yorker can run humor pieces with cursing in them. In other publications, you can’t.

What happens if someone misinterprets your humor? How do you handle it?

On the few times this happened, I explained what I was after. If I was out of line, I apologized. I tend to go over my humor and think it through before I let it be published. And when I said I apologized, I told the person that I’m sorry she was offended. But I didn’t publish an apology. Like you do with stuff in the fridge, if in doubt, throw it out.

I’m not offended by many things, so I usually wind up having someone else read through it just in case.

That’s a good thing to do. I’ve read stuff to my husband and my assistant to make sure I’m not out of line.

Should people avoid contentious areas like politics, religion, or sexuality?

It depends on the situation. I joke about having grown up Catholic. I saw a comic recently who joked about being a lesbian. I think if you can without offending people, great. Or, your brand may be offending people. Some great comics and humorists offend folks all the time because they have different points of view. But with my brand, I’m not mean to people, nor would I say/write something to deliberately hurt them.

You injected a lot of humor into your book on moving. Why was it important to you to do that?

Using humor got me through our move, which was so stressful. I use humor in many stressful situations. If something crazy or stressful happens and I’m with friends, one will usually say, “Great, now this is going to be a column.” And it usually will end up as one.

What should writers never do when it comes to adding humor to their writing?

If you’ve got a brand, don’t go against it. I thought of a funny tweet, but I didn’t post it – it wasn’t my type of humor. For example, you wouldn’t see Ellen [DeGeneres] being cruel to someone. That doesn’t fit her brand or mine.

Where do you seek inspiration for your humor writing?

Everywhere! Life is full of ridiculous experiences — that’s comedy gold. I just pay attention and write them down.

Do you make little notes when you think something’s funny?

All the time! I carry a notebook in my purse, but I’ve been known to scribble on parts of envelopes, napkins, scraps of paper — anything I can write on. I wrote something on my hand once, but it rubbed off before I got home.

Do you have any tips for someone trying to make their humor writing go viral?

Stuff that goes viral appeals to a mass audience, or it’s just weird. See what has gone viral and use that as examples. Viral stuff also ties in with something that is really topical but covers it in a way that no one else has, so be quirky.

In terms of adding bits of humor to a non-comedic piece, what’s your favorite article you’ve written, and why?

That’s easy: “Discovering My Inner Wench.” I had humor throughout it, but I was serious about talking with folks behind-the-scenes at this Renaissance festival. They were really interesting, and the reasons they worked there were so cool. But I got to dress up in authentic garb, sing songs when I served people at Steak on a Stake (“’Tis not just lunch, ’tis a weapon too!”). It was so much fun! But it was a more serious story.

You can read more of Wojo’s work on her website, WojosWorld.com, and learn more about her on her ProfNet profile.

Maria Perez is Director of Online Community Relations and connects journalists with subject matter experts on ProfNet. To read more from Maria, check out her ProfNet Connect blog.

Contract Confusion: Tips for Journalists on Non-Competes and Work for Hire

John F. Bradley, Esquire, and Francisco R. Montero share their tips for navigating journalism job contracts

John F. Bradley, Esquire, and Francisco R. Montero share their tips for navigating journalism job contracts

You’ve submitted your best work samples and gone on several interviews. You might even have hired an agent to help navigate the job-finding process. Now, all you have to do is sign the dotted line.

Put your pen down and read this first.

From non-competes to owning the rights to your work, it’s necessary to understand the terms of a contract and how it impacts your career.

Before, you may not have thought twice before signing a contract. But don’t allow your inexperience or work status to pressure you into agreeing to terms you’d otherwise reject.

“Some journalists seeking employment may be willing to accept terms far different from others who have more experience or have a better financial ability to wait for the next job,” explains John F. Bradley, Esquire,  a nationally recognized entertainment attorney with Bradley Legal Group, P.A.

In this blog post, Bradley and Francisco R. Montero, managing partner with Fletcher, Heald & Hildreth, P.L.C., break down two key terms that journalists should expect in a contract.

Ownership of Your Work

After establishing an audience, popular journalists such as morning radio show hosts and TV personalities may face terms that limit their personal brands.

Montero said the limitations placed on the personality’s ability to appear as a spokesperson, in commercials, or other content outside the bounds of employment sometimes can be an issue.

Employers usually want to safeguard the intellectual property or content developed by the journalist and make sure the articles, columns, or shows remain the property of the employer, even if they were completely developed by the employee, Montero explained.

Print journalists should pay particular attention to the term “work for hire.”

“Many journalists who work for news agencies or content aggregators are working on an assignment/work for hire basis,” Bradley said. “This means that the product of the journalist’s work, i.e. blogs, articles, short stories, etc., are owned by their employers. In many circumstances, this point is not negotiable. However, depending on the leverage that the journalist may have in their relationship, sometimes this point can be negotiated to an extent.”

He goes on to explain a term that should be included in an agreement involves the content created by the journalist that isn’t published during the work relationship. He also recommends asking substantive questions regarding quoting third parties or potential issues of libel or slander, acting as a “ghost writer,” or signing a work-for-hire agreement.

Non-Competes

Many companies also may hand you a non-compete agreement. Beware. Non-competes can silence your career anywhere from a few months to a year after leaving your employer.

“I would certainly encourage journalists not to execute non-competition agreements which seem to be overbroad in terms of their duration or geographic area,” Bradley said. “I would also like to make sure that there are reasonable terms for the termination of an agreement such that the journalist is not prohibited from moving forward with their career after a relationship with an employer is terminated.”

Montero points out that the non-compete may not even be enforceable.

“For many years, the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists labor union, which merged with the Screen Actors Guild in 2012, has lobbied state by state to have non-competes as applied to broadcast personalities and staff deemed unenforceable,” he said. “Despite that, you will frequently see non-competes in contracts, even in states where they are largely unenforceable. Even if it is unenforceable, the uninformed employee may be reluctant to violate the covenant.”

A contract is required in almost every new job.

But it’s important to understand exactly what you’re agreeing to. If you’re in the entertainment industry, for example, discussing the terms with an experienced entertainment lawyer will help you decide whether renegotiating is right for you.

This blog post is provided for informational purposes only and is not intended as legal advice. Readers should consult counsel of their own choosing to discuss how these matters relate to their individual circumstances.



Jessica Alas is Media Relations Director, Multicultural Markets and Hispanic PR Wire at PR Newswire. Follow her at @alasjessica.

Blog Profiles: Caregiving Blogs

Caregiving Blogs We Love

Caregiving Blogs We Love

Welcome to Blog Profiles! Each week, PR Newswire media relations manager Christine Cube selects an industry or subject and a handful of sites that do a good job with promoting and blogging about the space. Do you have a blog that deserves recognition? Tell Christine why on PR Newswire for Bloggers.

I have a huge respect for the caregiving industry.

Several of my friends have chosen this career direction, and I’ve found their work transcends just being a “job.” It’s who they are.

Inspired, I decided to look at some great caregiving blogs that aim to help those who help others.

The Caregiver’s Voice brings “caregivers hope and strength with knowledge, support, and humor.” It’s managed by Brenda Avadian.

I really liked several posts on The Caregiver’s Voice. They include Avadian’s piece, Preventing Dementia – We Become What We Eat, and a couple of guest posts, Caregiver for Wandering Stroke Survivor Aided by a Four-Legged Security System and How to Travel with Elders Living with Dementia.

The latter offers some great tips, including the best way to travel is the most direct – by car or plane.

“The best places one with dementia may enjoy are those that are familiar – whether old neighborhoods and family homes or places visited from years ago and still fondly recalled,” writes blogger Derek Hobson-Nahigyan. “Familiar places also have the advantage that if your loved one should become lost, you have a better chance to locate him/her.”

Follow @CaregiversVoice on Twitter.

eCare Diary simplifies life for the caregiver. The blog is part of a much bigger site that includes a care diary, message board, important documents, articles, Q&As, radio shows, videos, webinars, and tools.

Some of the more interesting pieces I read on eCare Diary include How Fall-Proof Are Your Stairs? and Is a Compensation Claim Restricted to Just Physical Injuries?

In the second post, most people might consider compensation claims as being only made for physical injuries.

“The most common types of physical injuries occur as a result of road traffic accidents and general slips, trips and falls,” the blog says. “The truth is that although the majority of claims are for physical injuries sustained during an accident, many people make accident compensation claims for the mental consequences of an accident. These may not be visible like a physical injury, but can be just as traumatic and are often a side effect of the physical injury.”

Follow @eCare_Diary on Twitter.

EldercareABC Blog began as an idea based on “empathy and community.”

It was started by Alberta, Canada-based husband and wife team, Steve and Sandra Joyce.

“My wife Sandy and I had cared for both of our parents and now they were all gone,” Steve Joyce writes on the blog. “What was not gone was the memory of how challenging the experience had been. We had raised two children and thought we knew what care giving was about.”

Then Joyce posts a question: “If it requires a village to raise a child, then what does it take to care for an aging parent?”

I liked several posts on EldercareABC. They include Assisted Living Providers Add Solutions for Hospital Referrals and Gift Idea for Aging Parents: The Old Neighborhood Reunion.

In the latter, blogger Joy Loverde shared her experience growing up in the 50s and 60s in her mother’s neighborhood, a Chicago suburb called Melrose Park.

It seemed ideal: The typical day included adults and children milling out of each other’s homes. No doors were ever locked. Children went to the same school; parents partied together.

So Loverde arranged a lunch reunion for her mother with some of the surviving Melrose Park residents. They met at a local restaurant.

“Many of us brought photographs of times gone by,” she wrote. “We toasted those who are no longer with us. It was a bittersweet experience.”

Follow @steveeldercare on Twitter.

The Caregivers’ Living Room is the blog of Donna Thomson, who writes extensively about eldercare and family caregiving.

This is a powerful site. I totally identified with a post about grief and loss – a book review, actually – Memoir of Mourning: Journey Through Grief and Loss to Renewal.

“The intense personal drama of tending to a dying loved one is not a subject for dinner table chat,” Thomson said. “It is life-changing and yet frequently, we do not have the experience or knowledge to decipher the many meanings in it.”

I also very much appreciated the post, Saying ‘I’m Fine’ When I’m Not.

Follow @Thomsod on Twitter.

P.S. Ever wonder how we come up with ideas for the blog profile topics? Our handy list of industries and subjects on PR Newswire for Journalists stays top of mind. If you’re a blogger or journalist looking for caregiving and health care news, let us know. We’re happy to customize that news feed for you on PR Newswire for Journalists.

Christine Cube is a media relations manager with PR Newswire and freelance writer. Follow her @cpcube.

Did You See That Press Release? The Ex-Employee Menace, Retirement Woes, and Katy Perry’s Reign

With thousands of news releases published each week on PR Newswire for Journalists, no one can possibly keep up with every one of them. Here are some of our favorite releases from the past week that you might have missed.

If you’re not already a registered member of PR Newswire for Journalists, you can register at prnmedia.prnewswire.com. Customize your profile to get the news releases you want before they make headlines. It’s free and takes only a few moments.

PRNewsFoto: Intermedia

Source: PRNewsFoto/Intermedia

The Ex-Employee Menace: 89 Percent Retain Access to Salesforce, QuickBooks & Other Sensitive Corporate Apps

Every month, hundreds of thousands of Americans leave their jobs. And they’re bringing their IT access with them — from passwords to the corporate Twitter account to confidential files stored in personal Dropbox accounts.  This data comes from the 2014 Intermedia SMB Rogue Access Study, which was released Aug. 13.

Based on a survey of knowledge workers performed by Osterman Research, this study quantifies the staggering scope of the “rogue access” problem. It also presents a wake-up call for every business in the country. See the full release to learn more.

Want to make sure you don’t miss releases like this? Sign up for PR Newswire for Journalists and create a free profile to have releases emailed to you about the workforce, high-tech security and other topics you cover. Get started now.

36 Percent of Americans Haven’t Saved Anything for Retirement

More than one-third of all Americans (36 percent) have not saved money for retirement, according to a new Bankrate.com report. Sixty-nine percent of 18-29 year-olds haven’t saved anything, along with 33 percent of 30-49 year-olds, 26 percent of 50-64 year-olds, and 14 percent of people 65 and older.

The good news is that Americans who are saving are starting earlier. Twice as many 30-49-year-olds started saving in their 20s as opposed to their 30s. But 50-64-year-olds were only slightly more likely to have started saving in their 20s than their 30s, and Americans 65 and older were almost evenly split between starting in their 20s, 30s, and 40s.   See the full release to learn more.

Interested in receiving more personal finance and banking news like this? Sign up for PR Newswire for Journalists and create a free profile to get releases sent to you by email on the topics you cover. Get started now.

Source: PRNewsFoto: SeaWorld Entertainment

Source: PRNewsFoto: SeaWorld Entertainment

SeaWorld Announces First-Of-Its-Kind Killer Whale Environment and More Than $10 Million in New Funding for Research and Conservation Projects

SeaWorld Entertainment, Inc. announced Aug. 15 that it plans to build new, first-of-its-kind killer whale environments and that it will fund new programs to protect ocean health and killer whales in the wild. The new projects will build on SeaWorld’s legacy of providing state-of-the-art, innovative homes for its animals and will offer park guests unique and inspiring killer whale encounters for generations to come.

As part of its vision for the future, the company also pledged $10 million in matching funds for killer whale research and is embarking on a multimillion-dollar partnership focused on ocean health, the leading concern for all killer whales and marine mammals.   See the full release to learn more.

Don’t miss other tourism and animal news like this. Sign up for PR Newswire for Journalists and create a free profile to get releases sent to you by email on the topics you cover.  Get started now.

FMCS Statement on Tentative Agreements at the Metropolitan Opera

Allison Beck, deputy director of the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service (FMCS), issued the following statement on Aug. 18 on tentative agreements between the Metropolitan Opera and two of its largest unions, Local 802 of the American Federation of Musicians and the American Guild of Musical Artists (AGMA).

“I am pleased to announce that after many hours of intense negotiations, representatives of the Metropolitan Opera, Local 802 and AGMA have reached tentative agreements,” Beck said. “These agreements are subject to ratification. Federal mediators joined the negotiations in response to a joint request for assistance from the parties.” See the full release to learn more.

Want to make sure you don’t miss other labor union and arts news like this? Sign up for PR Newswire for Journalists and create a free profile to have releases emailed to you about the topics you cover. Get started now.

 

Source: PRNewsFoto/ SeaWorld Entertainment

Source: PRNewsFoto/ Royal Revolution

Killer Queen’s Royal Revolution by Katy Perry

Katy Perry doesn’t break the rules; she makes them. Her unconventional artistic vision is at the core of her newest fragrance.

“In some ways wearing fragrance is like putting on an invisible suit of luxurious armor. I want Royal Revolution to inspire women to make their own rules and embrace the idea that beauty and inner confidence can come together to become your secret weapon,” said Katy Perry. See the full release to watch a video marking the launch.

Interested in receiving more news like this? Sign up for PR Newswire for Journalists and create a free profile to receive releases on new style and beauty products, music, and other topics you cover. Get started now.

Larry Grady is online content manager at PR Newswire for Journalists. He has worked in business media for nearly 30 years and enjoys reality TV and daydreaming about travel and wine.

Around the Wire: Build a Blog Worth Monetizing, Social Journalism for Ferguson & More Media News

Welcome to the latest installment of Around the Wire, PR Newswire’s round up of journalism, blogging, and freelancing stories from the past week.

Blogs Worth Monetizing; Photo of money by peddhapati/Flickr; used under CC BY 2.0

Photo by peddhapati/Flickr; used under CC BY 2.0

1. How to Build a Blog Worth Monetizing (ProBlogger)

A recent #BlogChat co-hosted by ProBlogger’s Darren Rowse became the biggest chat of the popular series’ history. And no wonder, since the topic focused on blog monetization. Because the fast-moving chat covered so much, Rowse organized its best tweets, presentation slides, and tips in this comprehensive recap.

2. What Could Social Journalism Do For Ferguson? (Jeff Jarvis’ BuzzMachine)

“Journalism must see itself as a service,” writes journalist, professor, and social journalism advocate Jeff Jarvis. “It should start with hearing the needs of a community and then and only then deciding which tools to bring to bear to help a community meet its goals and improve its lot.” In this blog post, Jarvis suggests how these principles would help the journalists covering Ferguson better support the community.

3. How Journalists Like James Foley Fall Victim to World’s ‘Most Dangerous Conflict’ for Reporters (The Washington Post)

When an Islamic State militant executed American journalist James Foley on Tuesday, the public was reminded of the tremendous danger journalists face in the Middle East and other war-torn regions.

The Washington Post examines how many of these journalists – including Foley – are often freelancers who take these dangerous risks to report, despite having very few resources.

4. BuzzFeed Aims at Latino Audience With L.A. Hires (LA Weekly)

In the U.S., one in five of the BuzzFeed generation is Latino, says editor-in-chief Ben Smith. To provide more authenticity in its Latino-focused reporting, the site has added 12 Latino staffers and three fellows this year, up from two staff members previously.

This focus on the Latino audience has led to an improvement in BuzzFeed’s in-depth immigration reporting, with the National Association of Hispanic Journalists recognizing BuzzFeed for “truly humanizing stories about Latinos fighting, protesting, fasting for immigration reform.”

5. ICYMI: Catfishing and Brick Have New Definitions (Beyond PR)

The Oxford Dictionary just unveiled its newest additions, and some of the entries caught PR Newswire’s Grammar Hammer off guard. On our sister blog Beyond PR, she looks at what she’s learned from these words and their new meanings.

Subscribe to Beyond Bylines in the sidebar or add our RSS feed to get media trends, journalist interviews, blog profiles, and more sent right to your inbox or feed reader. 

Amanda Hicken is a media relations manager with PR Newswire for Journalists. Follow her at @ADHicken for tweets about the media, comic books, and her love of Cleveland.